Transforming Agriculture, Perennially
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Prairie Festival speaker presentations, webinars, civic science, and more videos can be found on this page.

 

 

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Flatland, the Nonprofit Newsroom at Kansas City PBS, visited The Land Institute to learn about the perennialization of grain crops and the role of perennial grains as a climate-resilient component of sustainable food systems of the future. This episode is part of the network’s “Harvesting Change” series, which reports on the region’s food and agriculture systems and is part of PBS’s larger climate programming initiative.

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The Master Brewers Association of the Americas Podcast hosted Tessa Peters, Director of Crop Stewardship at The Land Institute, and other special guests to discuss recent developments with Kernza in the beer industry, the perennial grain’s distinct characteristics in malting, brewing, and distilling, its environmental benefits, and more.

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Hosts of the All About Beer podcast Don Tse and Em Sauter spoke with Tammy Kimbler, Chief Communications Officer at The Land Institute, and Layne Carter, Operations Manager at Aslan Brewing (one of the 11 breweries participating in the Patagonia Provisions Kernza beer project) to learn about the perennial grain, its flavor profile in beers, the process of brewing with Kernza, and the environmental benefits that accompany its use.

Click here to listen to the episode on the All About Beer website.

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In December 2023, the University of Vermont’s Institute for Agroecology held the 2023 Agroecology Summit, which hosted several speakers including The Land Institute’s Tim Crews (Keynote) and research partner Nick Jordan of the University of Minnesota’s Forever Green Initiative. The event was also co-produced by Aubrey Streit Krug, Director of the Perennial Cultures Lab at The Land Institute.

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PBS traveled to The Land Institute’s Salina, Kansas headquarters to learn about the role of perennial grains in the future of agriculture for their “My World Too” series.

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Aubrey Streit Krug, Director of the Perennial Cultures Lab at The Land Institute, provides an overview of the Perennial Atlas Project, a new civic science project that will engage up to 250 participants working with perennial grain crops and their annual counterparts across the US to advance perennial grain research.

Click here to learn more about this project and get involved.

 

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Aubrey Streit Krug, Director of the Perennial Cultures Lab, discusses perennial grains, perennial cultures, and the new Perennial Atlas Civic Science project on Minnesota’s’ Food Freedom Radio.

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Tammy Kimbler, Chief Communications Officer at The Land Institute, spoke on the Mothering Earth podcast to provide an overview of perennial grain crops, their classification and comparison to annual grains, and their importance for global nutrition, agricultural systems, and communities.

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CBC’s Allison Dempster reports on the climate-resilient capabilities and market opportunities for Kernza perennial grain, interviewing a Canada grower and the Brewmaster of Hopworks Urban Brewery to learn more.

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Hana Fancher, Market Stewardship Specialist at The Land Institute, along with Kernza research collaborator Nicole Tautges from the Michael Fields Agricultural Institute, spoke on the Come Rain or Shine podcast about the multiple environmental benefits of the perennial grain and the future direction of the Kernza market.

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The podcast Garden Futurist spoke with Tim Crews, Chief Scientist and Director of the International Program at The Land Institute, on humans’ relationship with agriculture and the planet, the role of perennials in building healthy soil ecosystems, and a discussion on how ecological perennial gardening ideas could scale up to our global agricultural landscapes.

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Dr. Brandon Schlautman of The Land Institute and Peter Miller of Sustain-A-Grain spoke on the Future of Agriculture podcast about “the potential for perennial grains, what it takes to commercialize a brand-new crop, and ways to build the supply chain in a way that buyers remain happy, farmers remain profitable, and supply and demand can grow together at a sustainable pace.”

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