Transforming Agriculture, Perennially
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Category: Natural Systems Agriculture

The Land Institute and Aubrey Steit Krug, Director of Ecosphere Studies, are featured in a new episode of the BBC’s program Future Food. The episode “Turning Back the Clock” looks…

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Scientists hope a new kind of perennial grain, Kernza, offers a taste of what environmentally-friendly farming could look like. “It’s so different from anything I’ve baked with,” says my baking…

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Is it possible to raise crops that can feed the world yet have little impact on the environment? Rachel Stroer, President of The Land Institute, believes it’s not only possible,…

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If the taxpayers’ money is going to support agriculture, it should support those who provide ecosystem services. I moved back to Iowa to farm with my family in 2010 and…

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The Land Institute is developing new forms of perennial – rather than annual – staple food crops. Instead of having to sow their seeds every year, farmers will be able to harvest…

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News report from Pioneer PBS in southeastern Minnesota on the newly formed Perennial Promise Growers Cooperative that has an eye towards marketing perennial crops — Kernza®, a perennial grain, to…

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LAWRENCE — Five University of Kansas researchers are part of a multi-institutional team awarded a five-year, $12.5 million National Science Foundation grant focused on the restoration of native prairie and…

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To build a different system—one that values healthy soils, biodiversity, clean water, and human capital overexploitation and profit at all costs—we must invest in the knowledge that supports it. Soil…

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WYOMING – Intermediate wheatgrass is an imported grain that has been grown in the U.S. Great Plains and Intermountain West since the 1930s; but could it be used in marginal…

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People across the U.S. are using the Sustainable Development Goals as a road map to build back better by turning these global ambitions into local action. In the Midwest, that…

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Wes Jackson recalls the Topeka farm where he was born, in 1936, as “an agricultural paradise, with an abundance of plants for food, for flower gardens, for beauty.” In that…

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A soil scientist from RUDN University found out that plants with deep root systems promote the storage of organic carbon in the soil. This, in turn, can help reduce the…

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